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Winter Magic

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Winter Magic

Day 1: Extreme Winter Sport

 

• Kaldbakur, the longest ski run in Iceland. A snowcat takes you up to the top, then you can ski, snowboard, walk, sled back down, or just board the snowcat once more for the return journey. 
• Tröllaskagi peninsula for catskiing or heliskiing where you can ski all the way down to the Arctic Ocean. 
• Soak in a deliciously hot outdoor geothermal tub on a cold winter’s day.

Day 2: Nature’s Adventures

 

• A trip to Goðafoss waterfall and the Mývatn area with its volcanic pearls of nature; Krafla crater, Hverarönd geothermal area and boiling mudpits, Dimmuborgir lava formations and Skútustaðagígar pseudo craters. Activities on snow and ice such as horseback riding, bowling, snow mobile trips and cross country skiing. 
• A superjeep tour to Europe’s most powerful waterfall, Dettifoss. 
• The Geothermal Spa and nature baths; relax in the deliciously hot water and view a star-filled sky and the breath-taking swathes of northern lights.

Day 3: Ski Resorts in Eyjafjörður Fjord

 

•  Hlíðarfjall Ski Centre is the most popular skiing area in Iceland. But there are four other well-equipped  and flood-lit ski resorts in Eyjafjörður. 
• Northern lights tours, scuba diving, superjeep tours and boat trips.
• A variety of restaurants, pubs and authentic Icelandic nightlife.

Sightseeing and Helicopter Flights

For those interested in flying or observing scenery from above or a bit of both, aerial sightseeing tours by plane or helicopter are awe inspiring experiences. For those whom are in to skiing there are world famous Heli skiing areas in North Iceland.

Snowmobile & Snowcat Tours

Many agencies offer snowmobile-, snowcat- or ATV tours. They are suitable for anyone looking for a little excitement and adventure while on vacation.

Skiing

Ski Iceland is easy. In North Iceland there are seven well-equipped and flood-lit ski resorts open from November to May, offering ski rental and ski schools for everyone. Whether you are a beginner or an extreme skier you got the right place. We also have excellent facilities for cross-country skiing, sport tours and extreme sport experiences.

Goðafoss waterfall

The Goðafoss waterfall is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in Iceland. The water of the river Skjálfandafljót falls from a height of 12 meters over a width of 30 meters.

In the year 1000, the Lawspeaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði made Christianity the official religion of Iceland. After his conversion, Þorgeir threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall. Goðafoss Waterfall is part of the Diamond Circle explore the Diamond Circle

https://www.northiceland.is/diamondcircle.

Geothermal baths

Few things are more cozy than relaxing in a hot pool in the middle of nature. Iceland has an abundance of easily accesible natural pools 

Akureyri

Akureyri is the little big city of Iceland. It is large enough to offer a rich selection of entertainment, art and culture, yet small enough to be very personal and close to nature. It‘s easy to be fascinated by Akureyri with it‘s with brightly painted wooden houses, cosy bars and steep streets leading down from the hills into the friendly city centre. Even the traffic lights are cute, with stop lights in the shape of red hearts. 

With a population of only 19,000, it’s remarkably calm in comparison to Reykjavik.

You can easily explore all the major spots in town on foot. Here you‘ll find a wide range of activities and interesting places e.g. notable museums, the world’s most northerly botanic garden, one of Iceland’s most popular swimming facilities, 18-hole golf course, the best skiing area in the country and great hiking trails. Best of all, use of the city buses is completely free of charge.

Akureyri is also a great base camp for many of Iceland’s most beautiful natural wonders, such as waterfalls, volcanic areas and canyons, as well as numerous exciting activities, such as rafting, hiking, caving, whale watching and horseback riding.

Húsavík

Húsavík is the oldest settlement in Iceland, besides being the largest town in Þingeyjarsýsla district and the service centre for the surrounding area. The town is known for whale watching tours in Skjálfandi Bay and is often referred to as the Whale Capital of Iceland. Up to 23 species of whale, including the Blue Whale, as well as large colonies of puffins can be found in or around the bay. One can experience the gigantic life-size of whales in the local Whale Museum where, amongst others, a 22m long skeleton of a Blue Whale is on display. There are several whale watching companies to choose from in Húsavík and sailing from there in pursuit of these wonderful creatures is an experience no one should miss and will certainly never be forgotten.

Húsavík is linked with Eurovision. The film Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire and Saga is based on two characters Lars Erickssong played by Will Ferrell and Sigrit Ericksdottir played by Rachel McAdams. Húsavík is the hometown of the duo and the title song is also named Húsavík. It's likely you will see some locals from the movie if you visit Húsavík. If you have limited time we recommend taking the Fire and Saga Tour.

The Museum House at Húsavík, as the inhabitants of the district call their cultural centre, houses part of the South Þingeyjarsýsla District Museum, a maritime museum, natural history museum, folk museum, district archives, photograph archives, and an art gallery.

Cultural life in and around the town is flourishing, the active and enthusiastic drama society being among the best amateur theatre groups in Iceland. There are a number of choirs and instrumental groups playing an active role in the field of music.

Services in Húsavík are different types of accommodation, restaurants and cafés, a brewery, a geothermal swimming pool and campsites as well as a golf course and skiing area on the outskirts of town. A newly opened sea bath invites for a dip in geothermal hot sea water while enjoying a magnificent view over the bay. Húsavík is serviced by Húsavík airport. Húsavík is part of the Diamond Circle explore the Diamond Circle www.northiceland.is/diamondcircle 

Mývatn

Mývatn offers a unique natural environment. With large contrasts and short distances, you can experience the most and the best that Iceland has to offer. Large open spaces with roads and walkways lead travellers to unworldly locations, where volcanic eruptions have played a crucial role in the formation of the landscape. Whether the plan is to enjoy the landscape, examine unique natural phenomena or take a closer look at the plant and birdlife, Mývatn has it all. Furthermore, the area offers a variety of services in accommodation, food, and entertainment, based on years of experience and knowledge. Mývatn attracts huge numbers of travellers in the summer, but many believe the lake and its surroundings to be no less impressive in the wintertime.

Mývatn is the 4th largest lake in Iceland, 37 km2 in area. Its shores are indented with many coves and inlets and its surface is dotted with around 50 small islets and skerries. Midges (Chironomidae) are abundant and the ubiquitous swarms of these tiny flies give the lake its name.

The lake itself is very shallow, and the rays of the sun reach the lakebed everywhere. The ecology of the lake area is extremely diverse and interesting; one important characteristic of Mývatn is the prolific growth and abundance of freshwater seaweed. On the bed of the lake there are great quantities of diatoms, while nearer the surface, Mývatn's famous arctic char weave their way between aquatic plants and little islets topped with fertile vegetation. 

On and around the lake there is a teeming and varied birdlife and Mývatn is the habitat of many kinds of lake and marsh birds. However, much of Mývatn's fame can be attributed to the fact that during summer, there is a greater variety of duck species gathered on and around the lake than anywhere else in the world. Mývatn is a legally protected conservation area and appears on the register of internationally important wetlands, along with the Laxá river which flows out of the lake. Lake Mývatn is part of the Diamond Circle explore the Diamond Circle www.northiceland.is/diamondcircle

Trollaskagi

Tröllaskagi is a rugged peninsula, which lies between Skagafjordur and Eyjafjordur. It´s a maze of mountains, rivers and number of miniature glaciers. Ideal hiking country, maps available.

Swimming Pools

North Iceland has numerous swimming pools, mostly outdoors. These are nearly always fed with fresh, clear geothermal water, although a few swimming pools are heated in other ways and are usually indoors. While many decades ago Icelandic pools were built in order to teach people to swim, supplemental services have been added with time, including hot tubs, saunas, steam baths, tanning tables, water slides, children's and splash pools, and play equipment.

 

No better spot is imaginable for re-tanking physically and mentally on a cold autumn or winter day, or after the strain of a hiking or skiing trip, than a swimming pool with its hot tubs and saunas.

Swimming brings health and beauty!

Winter adventure

North Iceland is the number one destination for Icelander's winter activities. Here you'll find six ski resorts, one of them being Hlíðarfjall in Akureyri that is considered one of the best in Iceland.

For those seeking a bit more action, the home of heli-skiing is in the Tröllaskagi peninsula. Seemingly endless mountains make it the perfect location. If you are more interested in going to the top by other vehicles or on foot, that is on offer as well. Skiing from the top of a mountain down to the sea is an experience unlike any other.

In winter, there are multiple attractions and tours available. Go on a whale-watching trip, discover the dancing northern lights or soak in the geothermal pools. The culture blossom's during the winter with live theater and music. During Christmas time, make sure not to miss the Yule Lads. They live in Dimmuborgir near Lake Mývatn and tease people that come around. In December, you can expect a white Christmas in North Iceland. From October to April, the North is truly a winter wonderland.

North Iceland

Towns & Villages

Society and the economy have many faces. Whereas agriculture is the mainstay of rural areas, the towns depend upon fishing, industry, trade and a range of services, with each village having its own characteristics though they all prove hospitable hosts. 
The availability of food and accommodation and the possibilities at every location for recreation and entertainment make hopping between the villages informative as well as fun.   
In every case, the residents are lively and ready to celebrate.

Explore map with pictures

Map Akureyri Eyjafjarðarsveit Grímsey Raufarhöfn Kópasker Þórshöfn Bakkafjörður Húsavík Mývatn Laugar Svalbarðseyri Grenivík Hjalteyri Hauganes Árskógssandur Dalvík Hrísey Ólafsfjörður Siglufjörður Hofsós Hólar Varmahlíð Sauðárkrókur Skagaströnd Blöndós Hvammstangi Laugarbakki Borðeyri