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It is easy to access the islands around North Iceland and experience the easy-going lifestyle that characterizes them. 

Church of Grímsey
Miðgarðar is the site of the most northerly church in Iceland. It was consecrated by Bishop Jón Ögmundsson in the early 11th century and was dedicated to Ólafur the patron saint of the Nordic people. At that time two clergymen served the church, and mass was sung daily and twice on holy days. These services have dwindled but 50 clergymen have been recorded as serving the church over the years. The vicar of Dalvík is now in charge of the church. Miðgarðakirkja was built from driftwood in 1867 on a site near Miðgarðar farm but was moved over by its own length in 1932 due to fire hazardand, at the same time, a choir stall and portico with a steeple were added. The church was extensively renovated in 1932and reconsecrated in 1956. The altar painting is by a local artist painted in 1878 and is a copy of a work by Leonardo da Vinci. It was granted conservation status on 1st January 1990, in accordance with the provisions of legislation onancient buildings.  
Orbis et Globus
The artwork "Orbis et Globus" was inaugurated on the Arctic Circle in Grímsey Island in the fall of 2017. It is a 3-meter sphere which is meant to be moved around the north end of the island in accordance with the movement of the Arctic Circle.Before the 2018 Summer Solstice Festival in Grímsey, the artwork was moved about 130 meters to the south, and this year it will be moved approx. 69 meters.The artwork is a symbol and a landmark for the Arctic Circle and has attracted attention from all over the world. The aim of the project was to draw attention to this northern most part of Iceland and to increase attractiveness of the island for tourists. Already, this has happened with great success. The inhabitants of Grímsey are less than 100 people and it is of the utmost importance to strengthen residence there all year round.Most visitors that come to Grímsey now, aim to reach "the sphere of the north". They want to see and touch the artwork and while doing so step beyond the Arctic Circle.The walk from the harbour to the artwork is about 3.7 km and from the airport about 2.5 km. One must expect about 3 hours walk forth and back. It is recommended to stay overnight as the traditional stop of the ferry and the air plain is almost too short to enjoy and see the most essential things on the island. Things one should try to do while on the island is to walk around in the little village, drop by the Fiske-monument and read the sign-boards, visit the restaurant Krían (Arctic tern) and/or the smallest Café in Iceland at the Guesthouse Gullsól. Take a walk to the lighthouse at the islands southernmost point and walk along the south-west shore of the island and look at the beautiful basalt columns and old fishing huts. On that route one can find the "Century stones" which display the position of the arctic circle Anno 1717, 1817 and 1917. During the birding season (end April till beginning August) one must also calculate some time for bird-watching as that's one of the phenomenal things experiencing in Grímsey.Orbis et Globus was designed by the artists Kristinn E. Hrafnsson in collaboration with Studio Grandi. It was selected to be the new landmark for the Arctic Circle in a competition for such an artwork held in 2013.
Drangey
The rocky island Drangey in the middle of Skagafjordur is a flat topped mass of tuff, rising almost 200 meters out of the ocean. The cliffs serve as nesting sites for around million sea birds and have been used throughout Iceland´s history for egg collection and bird netting. Grettis Saga recounts that both Grettir and his brother Illugi lived on Drangey, for three years and were slain there. The island can only be ascended at one spot. Over the summer months, 20.May - 20.August, we offer daily trips to Drangey from Sauðárkrókur at 10:00 am. There are no scheduled tours during the winter months, but tours can be arranged on request.
Grímsey Basalt Columns
The size of the columns depends on the rate of cooling; very rapid cooling may result in very small columns, while somewhat slower cooling is more likely to produce large columns. 
Grímsey lighthouse
The lighthouse is located on the south-east corner of the island. In the beginning it was run manually with a gas lamp which had to be turned on and off manually. Now days the lighthouse is automatic and plays an important role to the boat traffic in the surrounding waters. Other lighthouses built according to the same plan as the Grímsey Lighthouse are Hegranesviti and Raufarhafnarviti. 
Flatey Island
Flatey is a beautiful island and an unforgettable experience to visit. You have the feeling time stops here or even goes back in history. Many residents in Húsavík have houses on Flatey, which though uninhabited since 1968, was once a lively village with a church, a schoolhouse, and a lighthouse. Residents slowly left once electricity began to arrive on the mainland. Spread flat, the island is rich in bird fauna, with over 30 different types of bird to watch, including among others Arctic Tern and the Puffins.