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Ring road sights

Travelling the Ring Road of Iceland is an experience that many seek to enjoy. Along the road, travellers can find multiple natural highlights as well as accommodation and food. It's not necessary to wander too far from the road in order to enjoy these highlights although we highly recommend going off the beaten track and drive along the Arctic Coast Way or the Diamond Circle for a very different road trip.

Kolugjúfur
 As you drive along Víðidalur, you will come to Kolugil Farm which stands beside the Víðidalsá river. Just below the farm, the waters flow peacefully downwards to plunge into the deep, rugged gorge called Kolugljúfur. Their journey then sends them cascading over many waterfalls which bear the name Kolufossar Falls in honour of the giantess, Kola. It is a breathtaking sight to walk on the the viewing platform and watch the calm waters of the river suddenly leap and tumble onwards over so many impressive falls – a sight which will leave no one unmoved.
Borgarvirki
Borgarvirki is a 10-15 metre high ridge of columnar rock. This phenomenon is a volcanic plug, and there is speculation as to whether it was, in ancient times, a district fortress and even, perhaps, a battleground.From Borgarvirki there is a wide panoramic view over a large part of the region and a viewfinder is in place to help locate some of the important landmarks.This is truly a unique natural phenomenon, but one which has also seen some improvements by the hand of man in bygone days.
Vatnsdalshólar
Vatnsdalshólar are a cluster of hills of all sizes across the mouth of Vatnsdalur valley. Thought to have been formed by a catastrophic landslide. These hills are considered to be one of the three “innumerables” things in Iceland along with the lakes in Arnarvatnsheidi and the islands on Breidarfjord in the west.
Þingeyrakirkja church
Þingeyrar was, in past times, one of the most famous estates in Húnaþing and also the site of a church. Now, the Þingeyrakirkja church commands one of the widest and most beautiful panoramic views in the county. It is said that no estate was as big as or endowed with such elegant buildings as Þingeyrar, which is probably not surprising as it was home to chieftains and the elite for many centuries. Þingeyrakirkja church was built of stone and consecrated in 1877. Þingeyrar was also the site of the Iceland’s first monastery, founded in 1133.
Hrútey
  Hrútey Island is the real feather in the cap of Blönduós town, which is almost encircled by the river Blanda. Hrútey is blessed with a wide variety of vegetation and birdlife is abundant, being the habitat of geese and many other species. It is easily accessible and lies just off Highway 1. There is a good parking area by the river bank and a trusty pedestrian bridge over to the island. Hrútey is an excellent place for outdoor exercise, or just to stop and take a break. There are good footpaths and a clearing with benches and picnic tables.
Víðimýrarkirkja church
Víðimýrarkirkja church is one of the few preserved turf churches in Iceland.  At the beginning of the 20th century its fate was uncertain, but luckily the immense cultural value of the building was recognised in time, and the National Museum of Iceland became responsible for its renovation. The church was built in 1834 and has turf walls, but timber gables both back and front.
Hraun í Öxnadal
Residence for writers, poets and scholars of nature studies. An exhibition of the live and works of Jónas Hallgrímsson, one of Iceland's most beloved poets.
The Pond
The Pond in Akureyri is a fun outdoor recreation area in the heart of the town. In summer, it is buzzing with life when cruise ships start coming with guests from all over the world as well as small boats are fishing and sailing around. At the Pond, there is a variety of birdlife, the whales blow, and occasional seals can be seen.
Akureyri Church
The Akureyri church is the symbol of Akureyri. It is a Lutheran church and was designed by the famous architect Gudjon Samuelsson and consecrated in 1940. The central stained-glass window above the altar formed apart of a set originating from England. The bas-reliefs on the nave balcony are by sculptor Asmundur Sveinsson and the baptismal font is a replica of a work by sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen.  The church is above the town center.  Attention!Please note that the church is closedwhen funerals or other services are taking place and it is advertisedespecially on the church door. For more information check the website akureyrarkirkja.is or send an email at akirkja@akirkja.is. 
Akureyri Botanical Garden
The Public Park was first opened in 1912 and the botanic section added in 1957. The park has been enlarged three times since 1912 and is now about 3.6 ha and lies at 40-50 m altitude at Eyrarlandsvegur road near midtown.  The aim of the botanical garden is to grow trees, shrubs and perennials in the demanding climate of Northern Iceland, which is characterized by pronounced seasonality of temperature and day length. Situated in the shelter of Eyjafjord, which is one of the longest fjords in Iceland and provides a favourable microclimate for plant growth. Beside the 430 native species the surprising number of 6600 alien taxa grow in the garden. The garden is an IPEN member and is active in seed-exchange, public information, educationand recreation.  The Public Park and Botanic Garden is open 1st of Jun eto 30 Sept. On weekdays from 08-22 and at weekends from 09-22. The garden facilities are closed over the winter, but visitors are welcome to come for a stroll, the gates are open.  
Mountain Súlur
Mt. Súlur is the town mountain of Akureyri. 
Goðafoss waterfall
The Goðafoss waterfall is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in Iceland. The water of the river Skjálfandafljót falls from a height of 12 meters over a width of 30 meters. In the year 1000, the Lawspeaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði made Christianity the official religion of Iceland. After his conversion, Þorgeir threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall. Goðafoss Waterfall is part of the Diamond Circle explore the Diamond Circle  https://www.northiceland.is/diamondcircle.  
Lake Mývatn
Mývatn is the 4th largest lake in Iceland, 37 km2 in area. Its shores are indented with many coves and inlets and its surface is dotted with around 50 small islets and skerries. Midges (Chironomidae) are abundant and the ubiquitous swarms of these tiny flies give the Lake its name.The lake itself is very shallow, and the rays of the sun reach the lake bed over its entire surface. The ecology of the lake area is extremely diverse and interesting; one important characteristic of Mývatn, being the prolific growth and abundance of freshwater seaweed. On the bed of the lake are great quantities of diatoms, while, nearer the surface, Mývatn’s famous arctic char weave their way between aquatic plants and little islets topped with fertile vegetation. On and around the lake there is a teeming and varied birdlife, and Mývatn is the habitat of many kinds of lake and marsh birds. However, much of Mývatn’s fame is due to the fact that, during summer, there are more different species of duck gathered on and around the lake than anywhere else in the world. Mývatn is a legally protected conservation area and appears on the register of internationally important wetlands, along with the Laxá river which flows out of the lake.
Dimmuborgir
Dimmuborgir or Dark Cities is an area of randomly strewn lava rocks and cliffs, surrounded by vegetation such as low bushes and plants. Dimmuborgir is a place of surprises with its myriad forms and images, small caves and towering volcanic rock, pierced by natural apertures. The most famous of these formations is the cave "The Church", aptly named for its dome-like ceiling. It is not only in summer that Dimmuborgir exerts its charm; a winter visit is also an invigorating experience which must include popping in to see the Yule Lads (Santas) who have settled there and made it their home.
Grjótagjá
Grjótagjá is a small cave in the Lake Mývatn area, and was a popular bathing place at one time. However, geological activity in the period 1975-1984, caused the temperature of the water to rise to such a degree that it has not been possible to bathe there since. But one can always dream ... a peep into the waters and a fertile imagination can conjure up visions of taking a dip in this cosy little cave, as was the custom in the past.
Hverfjall
Hverfjall has a large, circular explosion crater, about 140 metres deep and with a diameter of 1,000 metres. Hverfjall is one of Iceland's most beautiful and symmetrical explosion craters, besides being one of the largest of its kind in the world. It is estimated that the crater was created during a volcanic explosion and its likely around 2800 - 2900 years old.
Námafjall
At the foothills of this spectacular volcanic mountain is an expanse of hot springs called Hverir that are known for their variety. You will also discover fumaroles, mud pools and mud pots that all seem to be boil with relentless energy. The pass Námaskarð is strategically located at a short distance from the Krafla volcano system as well as other interesting geological spots like Búrfellshraun lava field and the desert Mývatnsöræfi. Námaskarð earns its notoriety chiefly because of its sulphurous mud springs called solfataras and steam springs called fumaroles. Though you will scarcely find any pure water spring in this wonderful geothermal site of Iceland, the beauty of the colourful minerals defies all comparison. The gigantic size of the mud craters is what makes you go 'wow' at the sight of them. The other thing that is sure to strike you about Námaskarð is the sheer lack of vegetation. The constant emission of the fumes has made the ground utterly sterile and acidic, unfit to sustain any floras and faunas. You must bear in mind that the fumes can be harmful for humans as well.